Tag Archives: shavees

The Morning After the Shave

It’s Monday morning, the day after the shave and Paul Smith was right, Monday morning came and everything was fine.

There are so many people to thank for a wonderful event yesterday.   As a I write this post, we know that we raised over $30,000 and more donations are left to be counted.  There were 100 shavees and 40 gallons of hair shaved.

First of all, thanks goes to my son, Jack Skowronnek, whose little heart has always cared so much.  I don’t know what most parents would do when their 10 year old announces the need to shave their head, but I’ll never regret my choice to let him do what his heart told him.  And of course, to Jordan Sonnenblick whose book inspired Jack in the beginning.

We are thankful for the 100 shavees who joined us yesterday in an effort to support children battling cancer in the Chattanooga area.  Every one is fabulous! And then, there are those we know on a personal level, whose support touches our hearts so deeply.

The most moving moment for me yesterday was watching the Chattanooga Roller Girls get their heads shaved.  Up until this point, I hadn’t cried yet.  I guess I’m getting a bit used to it.  However, while watching the girls, particularly Tamara Obscura, who was so obviously moved or terrified at what she had started, that’s when I lost it.  I cannot imagine what was going through their heads at the time – they couldn’t even see what was going on.  Flood gates were open at that point and the emotions begin to pour out.

One of THE funnest moments was had from the most charismatic group of shavees – the Chattahooligans!  Out of nowhere we heard their voices singing as they approached the shaving area.  The chanting/singing was so unexpected and drew the crowd in.  Here’s a peek of their antics.

Thank you to the following people who helped make yesterday a reality, and of course, to my husband Bill and the most beautiful daughter in the world, Faith.

Ali Dunn – Children’s Hospital Foundation

Paul Smith – The Chattanooga Market

EPB, our presenting sponsor, as well as their very own Dr. Shock, our emcee

Fantastic Sam’s

Jim Brewer –  Brewer Media Group

Michelle Lisotto –  Derryberry Public Relations

Dan, Kim & Doug and their team – Texas Roadhouse

The Chattanooga Roller Girls – by the way, their next home bout is June 30th!

BMW of Chattanooga

Brittany Moncrief – Moncrief Photography

Rich Smith – Rich Smith Photography

Tammy Rardin

The folks at WRCB 3’s 3 Plus You show

The morning crew at WDEF 12

Ken Nicholson – Trends on 3 (WRCB)

This N That

Jennifer Edge – Triple 7 Studio

Mike Taht – Munich RE

 

 

 

Chattanooga TFP Online – June 2, 2011

Signal Mountain youth seeking partners in cancer clip job

Jack Skowronnek of Signal Mountain would like to see more Chattanooga noggins.

The 12-year-old has been inspired by the book “Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie,” in which a middle school student gets his head shaved in solidarity with a younger sibling with cancer.

Jack will have his blond hair buzzed later this month to raise money for the Children’s Hospital Foundation at Erlanger. Jack, a rising seventh-grader at Signal Mountain Middle/High School, said he wanted to let people know “it’s OK to be bald.”

The hair affair — officially called Jack’s Chattanoggins — will play out on June 26 at Chattanooga Market in the First Tennessee Pavilion. In the meantime, he’s hoping to convince scores of area residents that bald is beautiful.

People also willing to risk a short summer cut can register for the event and raise money for the organization by visiting www.JackShaves.org.

At last count, 20 people — including some members of the Chattanooga Football Club — had registered for the hair-raising fundraiser, according to Dawn Skowronnek, Jack’s mother and the event organizer.

Jack first had his head shaved two years ago when the family lived in the Chicago area. Donations went to the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a volunteer-driven charity committed to funding the most promising research to find cures for childhood cancers.

He read the book on the recommendation of the librarian at his school, he said, and was inspired to shave his head as the character of the book did.

“I didn’t know you could raise money [that way],” he said.

That year, his haircut netted $1,300.

Last year, after the family moved to Signal Mountain, more than $3,000 was raised for the charity with a public event — and 14 shaved heads — at Sweet Gipsy Bakeshop Cafe on Signal Mountain.

Mrs. Skowronnek’s introduction to oncologist Dr. Eric Gratias at last year’s event and the Children’s Hospital Foundation’s desire to do a similar fundraiser led to Jack being asked to be the face of the 2011 affair.

Betsy Chapin Taylor, president of the Children’s Hospital Foundation, said it was the perfect pairing.

“As an organization devoted to advancing the well-being of children, Children’s Hospital Foundation is delighted to collaborate with a bright young man who recognizes that, even as a child, he has the power to make a positive impact on the world around him through his advocacy and fundraising to help local kids with cancer.”

With the elevated platform of Chattanooga Market, the 2011 goal for the fundraiser is $20,000, according to Mrs. Skowronnek.

“We need heads to shave and donations,” she said. “We hope people will come out and enjoy the event.”

She said she hopes area restaurants might be willing to host recruiting events or donate gift cards for participants and that corporate sponsors might come forward.

Mrs. Skowronnek said participants need not worry about becoming chrome domes. No razors are involved, she said.

“There’s a little [hair] left,” she said. “It’s all done with clippers.”

Nooga.com – June 19, 2011

Sixth-grader raises money for kids with cancer

• Published Sunday, June 19th 2011

Photo credited to Rich Smith Photography.

 

Most sixth-graders summer plans are focused around vacations and summer camps, but for 12-year-old Jack Skowronnek, that just is not enough.

Jack has partnered up with the Children’s Hospital Foundation at Erlanger to organize a head-shaving event called Jack’s Chattanoggins to raise money for children’s cancer treatments.

To find out more about the event and how you can help, visit http://jackshaves.org/ or http://www.jackschattanoggins.org

To find out more about the Children’s Hospital Foundation, contact Amanda Whitaker at Children’s Hospital at (423) 778-8057

The event, which takes place Saturday, June 26, at the Chattanooga Market, will be more than just head-shaving. There will also be food, music, and an auction, which will include an original painting that was donated by artist Jill English, who lost her son to cancer.

For Jack, this will be the third time he has shaved his head to support children with cancer.

The head-shaving began when Jack was just 10 years old, after he was inspired by a book he read called Drums, Girls, and Dangerous Pie, by Jordan Sonnenblick, in which a boy shaves his head to support his younger brother after he is diagnosed with leukemia.

“He finished the book and he just announced to me that he needed to shave his head,” his mother, Dawn Skowronnek, said.

Skowronnek said she wanted to teach her son that he could do more than just shave his head to support these kids, that he could also raise money to help pay the high cost of their treatment.

The first two year’s that Jack shaved his head, he signed up to do so through St. Baldricks, a national, non-profit organization that encourages people to shave their heads and donate to help cancer patients. In those two years, Jack raised more than $5,000.

This year, Skowronnek said Paul Smith, general manager of the Chattanooga Market, contacted her and asked if Jack would like to have his own event there.

“I was driving down the road and I listened to the story (on the radio) about Jack … and what he was doing and I wanted to do something,” Smith said. “It was just heartwarming and it sounded like it needed a larger audience.”

As a result of that, and the support of the Children’s Hospital Foundation, Jack’s Chattanoggins was created.

“I plan on doing this for the rest of my life,” Jack said. “It made me feel like you don’t have to know who the person is you just have to have a heart and care.”

One day, he said he hopes to have 1,000 people shave their heads at the event.

Smith, who has signed up to have his head shaved, said, “The best way for people to get involved … is to come in and put a little money down on our heads.”

How it works

Volunteers, called “shavees” will shave their heads in support of the children who lose their hair to cancer treatments. They will then receive donations in their names from friends and family members who want to support them.

All of the money raised will go to the Children’s Hospital Foundation and help fund treatments for the more than 50 Chattanooga-area children who are diagnosed with cancer each year.

ChattanoogaPulse.com – June 27, 2011

Cancer Charity Event Raises Over $17,000

Written by Pulse Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 27, 2011 – 8:04 am

In only its third year in existence, a local charity has set a new record.  Jack’s Chattanoggins is the brainchild of 12-year-old Jack Skowronnek. When he was ten, he read a book that inspired him to shave his head to show kids with cancer that being bald was OK.  He raised $1,200 that year.  Last year he got about a dozen other people involved and raised $3,200.  Sunday at the Chattanooga Market, the event saw more than 60 people shave their heads, raising more than $17,000, nearly half of that coming in direct donations during the event.

That money will stay right here in Chattanooga to be used at Children’s Hospital at Erlanger in the Pediatric Oncology Unit.

Jack’s Chattanoggins – June 26, 2011

Book by Jordan Sonnenblick

My name is Jack and I’m an ordinary sixth-grader. I like playing basketball and lacrosse, and enjoy time on my computer and texting friends. I also enjoy reading; from Harry Potter to Rocket Boys to Diary of a Wimpy Kid. But one book inspired me in ways I never thought any book could. Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie, by Jordan Sonnenblick, is a story about a middle school boy whose younger brother is diagnosed with leukemia. The boy ends up shaving his head to make his younger brother feel better about losing his hair to chemotherapy. After reading this book, I wanted to show my support for kids with cancer by shaving my own head. I’ve done this two years in a row and have managed to raise over $5,000 to help fight childhood cancer. Now, I want to go bigger!

This year, my friends at the Children’s Hospital Foundation are helping me raise money for kids’ cancer treatment by hosting my head-shaving event. On Sunday, June 26th, 2011, at the Chattanooga Market (one of my favorite places), volunteers called “shavees” will shave their heads in support of kids who lose their hair during cancer treatment. These shavees will receive donations in their name from their friends and family, and, in then the donations, help fund life-saving pediatric cancer treatment. Believe it or not, people will give a lot of money to see you sacrifice your hair. Don’t worry, it grows back!

Some facts from my friends at Children’s Hospital

The Pediatric Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Hospital is the only comprehensive oncology unit in the region with over 3,500 patient visits each year. This year alone, more than 50 Chattanooga area children will be diagnosed with cancer and over 95 percent of them will choose to stay Children’s Hospital to receive their treatment. Since the oncology doctors at Children’s Hospital follow the same cutting edge treatment protocols shared by other top children’s hospitals across the country, parents can be confident their children will receive the highest standard of care without having to leave their familiar social networks.

If you have been touched by a child with cancer, or, like me, have read about it, then you know they not only lose their hair but, sometimes, years from their childhood going through treatment. And, I hate to think of those kids that lose their lives altogether. But, together, we can support this important treatment and give children back their dreams.

To join me in the fun, or to learn more about Children’s Hospital Foundation, please visit www.jackschattanoggins.org or call Amanda Whitaker at Children’s Hospital at 423.778.8057. If you can’t participate as a shavee, then please think about volunteering, donating or just spreading the word. Thanks for your support. Together let’s help end kids’ cancer!

Just for fun, here are the bloopers from making the Welcome video for Jack’s Chattanoggins home page.